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About the Danish Fundraising Board

The Danish Fundraising Board is an independent collegial administrative body set up by the Danish Parliament (Folketinget) by Act No. 511 of 26 May 2014. In future, all responsibilities of public authorities relating to fundraising will be handled by the Danish Fundraising Board. 

The Danish Fundraising Board supervises fundraising to ensure compliance with the Danish Fundraising Act (only in Danish language). Additionally, the Board publishes an official listing (only in Danish language) of fundraising campaigns, which includes the accountings of the fundraising campaigns, on the Board’s website.

Furthermore the Danish Fundraising Board decides upon applications for permission to carry out house-to-house and/or street fundraising, as well as applications for permission to use the raised funds for other purposes than those stated in the fundraising campaign.

Moreover, the Danish Fundraising Board decides upon complaints about non-compliance with the Good Fundraising practice.

What is fundraising?

The Fundraising Act defines fundraising as follows: 

1(1). – (...) any kind of encouragement to make a donation for a predetermined purpose.’

This broad definition of the term “fundraising” makes sure, that all future technologies used in a fundraising campaign will fall within the scope of the Fundraising Act, if the campaign is for a predetermined purpose.  

Must fundraising campaigns be notified?

As a general rule, all fundraising campaigns must be notified to the Danish Fundraising Board at least two weeks before the campaign is launched.

However, certain types of fundraising campaigns are exempt from the duty to notify. One example is fundraising carried out among a small group of acquaintances, such as the members of a club or an association, or among colleagues. Further information on the fundraising campaigns that require no notification to the Danish Fundraising Board is outlined below under “Fundraising campaigns requiring no notification to the Danish Fundraising Board”. 

The new Fundraising Act also has a provision stipulating that certain organisations may carry out fundraising without prior notification of each campaign to the Danish Fundraising Board, but must instead notify to the Board that they do fundraising constantly all year around. To get this privilege, the relevant organisations must meet a number of specific conditions, including approval from the Minister for Taxation as eligible to accept tax-deductible charitable donations. Detailed information on the relevant conditions is given under: ‘Exempt from the duty to notify’ [information only in Danish]. 

Background of the duty to notify 

The notification scheme was introduced in 1972 and replaced a former scheme, under which the Ministry of Justice granted permission for fundraising activities. The purpose of the change of schemes was to make it easier to launch public fundraising campaigns because it was found reasonable to leave it to people themselves to decide what purposes they wanted to support as long as the fundraising campaign was carried out for legal purposes.







Fundraising campaigns must be notified to the Danish Fundraising Board to enable the Board to perform its supervision and control activities according to the fundraising rules, for example, if the Board suspects that raised funds are used for an illegal purpose.

Fundraising campaigns requiring no notification to the Danish Fundraising Board

As a general rule, fundraising campaigns must be notified to the Danish Fundraising Board before they are launched. However, several types of fundraising campaigns do not require notification to the Danish Fundraising Board:

Private fundraising campaigns



Private fundraising campaigns are campaigns in which the encouragement is solely aimed at persons who know the fundraiser or persons particularly related to the purpose of the fundraising campaign.

  • Firstly, a fundraising campaign is private if the encouragement to donate is aimed at persons who know the fundraiser. As an example is a fundraising campaign among colleagues for a farewell present or a fundraising campaign among the fundraiser’s own friends and family for a person’s hospital treatment abroad exempt from the duty to notify the Board.







    A certain degree of proximity is assumed to exist between the fundraiser and the person encouraged to donate.







    If an encouragement to make a donation is accessible to the public, the fundraising campaign can hardly be classified as private. An example may be fundraising campaigns on the internet which are open to everybody even though the campaign is addressed to a specific group of people known to the fundraiser. For example, a fundraising initiative on Facebook addressed to all a person’s ‘friends’ is not necessarily private. A specific assessment must be made of each case, taking into account the number of persons encouraged to make a donation and the relations of those persons to the fundraiser.



     
  • Secondly, a fundraising campaign is private if the encouragement is aimed at persons particularly related to the purpose of the campaign.







    As an example, an association fundraising money among its members to benefit the cause of the association, will normally be considered private, as the members have a particularly relation to the purpose of the campaign.

By contrast, a fundraising campaign among, for example, members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Denmark for religious purposes cannot be considered a private campaign due to its nature. 







In case a fundraising campaign is held within a restricted local area, a specific assessment is required to determine whether the purpose of the campaign is assumed to be so widely supported by the local population and thereby making the local population particularly related to the purpose of the fundraising campaign.  







Examples of such fundraising campaigns are campaigns carried out in a local area by pupils in support of a school camp and campaigns in a local area in support of the survival of the local cinema.







In certain cases it is therefore permitted to encourage the inhabitants of a restricted geographical area to make a donation without having to notify the Danish Fund Board about the fundraising campaign in accordance with the rules of the Fundraising Act.







The matter of whether there are such particular relations to the purpose of the fundraising campaign must be determined on the basis of a specific assessment of the individual campaign in its entirety. 

In case of doubt as to whether a fundraising campaign is a private campaign or falls within the scope of the Fundraising Act, the Danish Fundraising Board may be contacted. Contact details are given at the bottom of the page.

Campaigns to collect second-hand items of little value



Campaigns collecting second-hand items of little value don’t need to be notified to the Danish Fundraising Board. Usually, campaigns collecting unwanted items will also be in interest of the donors. This is highly relevant in cases where a collection of donated second-hand items are sold at flea markets or similar places. It is the value of the individual item, and not the total outcome of the second hand fundraising campaign that determines whether the campaign falls within the scope of the Fundraising Act.







Collections at indoor religious services or meetings



Collections made exclusively at indoor religious services or meetings under the responsibility of the relevant religious community or organisation are exempt from the rules of the Fundraising Act. This comprises all collections made by a religious community, whether or not the community has been recognised as a religious community. 







The religious community or organisation must be in charge of the collection. Other attendees at the meeting will therefore not be allowed to make collections at their own initiative.  

Another condition is that the collection is made exclusively at the relevant indoor meeting/religious service. If the collection is made as part of a large public fundraising campaign, the general rules of the Fundraising Act apply.

Fundraising campaigns carried out among enterprises, organisations and other (legal) entities



Fundraising campaigns carried out among private and public enterprises, institutions, organisations and associations are exempt from the rules of the Fundraising Act.







Fundraising for political parties



Funds can be raised for political parties without any prior notification to the Danish Fundraising Board.  

However, such fundraising may not be carried out as house-to-house or street fundraising. Nor can the Danish Fundraising Board grant separate permission for house-to-house or street fundraising for political parties. 

When assessing whether the beneficiary is a political party, the Board takes into account the objectives and structure of the relevant organisation. It will therefore be included in the assessment whether the organisation calls itself a political party and has a declared objective of being represented in the Danish Parliament, and whether it has a reasonable number of members and an organisational structure resembling the usual structure og a political party.







The Act does not apply to charity lotteries



Charity lotteries are governed by the Danish Act on Gambling, see Act No. 848 of 1 July 2010 as amended, and by Executive Order No. 1301 of 15 December 2011 on Charity Lotteries.

According to this legislation, associations, institutions, organisations and committees can organise a charity lottery for the benefit of charity or other non-profit purposes subject to a licence from the Danish Gambling Authority. The legislation specified above lays down rules on the criteria to be met to obtain a licence for a charity lottery and on the criteria to be met for charity lotteries to be permitted without prior application.

Fees

The Danish Parliament has stipulated in section 14(1) of the Fundraising Act that a fee must be paid to the Danish Fundraising Board in case of notifications and applications are submitted to the Danish Fundraising Board. Therefore, all organisations, associations and committees, etc., must pay a fee if the fundraising campaign falls within the scope of the Act.

The actual amount depends on the specific type of notification/application. The fee must be paid no later than at the same time of submitting the notification or the application.

Applications will be dismissed if the fee is not paid.

The fee must be paid to:  

Bank account of the Danish Fundraising Board







Danske Bank



Holmens Kanal 2-12



1092 Copenhagen K







Sort code: 0216 



Account No.: 4069198643



 

The description text field must include either a Central Business Register (CVR) number or, if the notifier/applicant has no such number, a telephone number.

Complaint guidelines

The Danish Fundraising Board is authorised to decide upon complaints about non-compliance with the Good Fundraising practice.

Complaints can be filed by:

  • Donors
  • Physical and legal persons, towards who the organisation or charity have aimed their fundraising campaign or the recruiting of new members (Facers)
  • Others having a legal interest in the examination of a complaint

Complaints must be in writing and submitted to the Danish Fundraising Board. To facilitate examination, the complaint form of the Danish Fundraising Board should be used. If the complainant has been in contact with the fundraiser/relief organisation/charity, any correspondence should be appended to the complaint. 


Indsamlingsnævnet | Adelgade 13 | DK-1304 København K | Telefon +45 3392 3334 | Fax +45 3920 4505 | E-mail indsamlingsnaevnet@civilstyrelsen.dk